1.17.2007

Coffee Cup Wisdom


My Starbucks-executive sister-in-law will be saddened to hear this, but until this morning I have never read one of those goofy 'The Way I See It' bits on the back of my cup (not even the one from Rick Warren...read the book). This is probably for two reasons:

First, I get cold drinks at least 50% of the time and the plastic cups don't have these little jewels of wisdom (what, Mr. Starbucks, are you saying by not including cold drink drinkers? As a left-handed person who already feels discriminated against by our society I have great cause for concern over this decision.).

Second, I will admit that I have read parts of almost every one of them. But I get bored easily and can't remember one that has ever kept my attention all the way to the end. Most try to be too profound and, as anybody who knows anything about me knows, profound....I'm not.

But today I read the entire one because it was one that sounded familiar. I don't know if I've heard this exact quote before of just multiple versions of it. But since I actually read the whole thing, I thought it was worth passing on.

The Way I See It #209 (have there really been 209 of these things?)

Growing up, my parents always said, "You will leave this world the same way you came into it: with nothing." It made me realize that the only things we do in this world that count are those things that make the world a better place for those who will come behind us.

--Tyrone B. Hayes
Bilogist, herpetologist and National Geographic Emerging Explorer.

Kurt's note: Dang, I understand the quote WAY more than I understand what this dude does for a living. I would expect something much more profound from somebody of his stature.

4 comments:

Joe said...

Is emerging explorer anything like emerging worship? This guy must be like the Dan Kimball of National Geographic! I wonder if he has a cool hair style too!

kurt Johnston said...

HA! classic. Dan has said he reads my blog so let's see if this comment pulls him out of the woodwork.

Wes said...

A Herpetologist works with snakes. I have a friend who fancies himself a herpatologist and we've gone "snake hunting" on a few occasions. By "snake hunting" I mean driving down a farm road at 30 mph between 9 and 11 p.m. Every time we saw a snake, he would slam on the brakes, jump out, and go look at. Needless to say, he is much less profound than Tyrone, but a herpetologist nonetheless.

The Starbucks Sister-in-Law said...

I like # 182:
"In my career I’ve found that 'thinking outside the box' works better if I know what’s 'inside the box.' In music (as in life) we need to understand our pertinent history ... and moving on is so much easier once we know where we’ve been."

-- Dave Grusin
Award-winning composer and jazz musician.

And yes, in response to your need to read more of them Kurt, you can scan thru the lot of them at: http://www.starbucks.com/retail/thewayiseeit_default.asp?act=1&last=33